2004

Multilingual Testing on Multiple Platforms

#65 Volume 15 Issue 5
MultiLingual Computing

Multilingual Testing on Multiple Platforms

As much as they need to be multilingual, software products need to qualify as multiplatform to truly provide for the global user. Take Palm OS 5, Linux Red Hat Advanced Server, Solaris 9, Windows XP or Mac OS X. Many questions and issues may come up when you are trying to achieve efficient testing of a product on some or all of these platforms. How do you prepare for efficient internationalization, localization and functional testing on software products that combine these platforms?

This article can serve as a beginner's guide for testing a product on several platforms. It describes the concepts you need to pin down, preempts some common issues and provides tips, solutions and best practices for teams involved in multiplatform testing. Full article.


Understanding the Complexities of CEEC Languages

August 2004
Regulatory Affairs Focus

Understanding the Complexities of CEEC Languages

The accession of the Central and Eastern European Countries (CEECs) to the European Union (EU) in May 2004 has brought a need to adapt to the changes that are no longer nigh but here to stay. Over the past several years, the 10 new members of the EU have been transposing a large number of EU directives for the medical device and pharmaceutical industries. Learn more about the impact and how it may affect you. Full article.

Copyright 2004, by the Regulatory Affairs Professionals Society (RAPS). Posted with permission on www.moravia.com. Reprinted from the August 2004 issue of Regulatory Affairs Focus. This article may not be published, reposted or redistributed without express permission from RAPS and payment of appropriate fees when applicable. To obtain such permission, send a message to reprints(at)raps.org.


Outsourcing Testing to China

April 2004
ClientSide News

Outsourcing Testing to China

As of late, many discussions have arisen in the localization industry regarding the outsourcing of engineering and testing functions to China. Many companies under intense pressure to increase gross margin have begun to bypass traditional US or European-based vendor solutions, or indeed their own operations, in favor of China.

There's no question that outsourcing to China has afforded some companies dramatic benefits in IT and testing operations, freeing money for projects that otherwise might never have been undertaken. Yet, it is important to assess the actual upfront and ongoing cost savings of an offshore engagement, which can vary by company and project. Factors such as vendor management, travel, communication with in-house staff, and knowledge transfer all come at a price. Full article.


India or China? To Build or to Buy?

Volume XIII, 1.3 March 19, 2004
The LISA Globalization Insider

India or China? To Build or to Buy?

Expansion to a foreign market often puts a company squarely into the middle of an age-old quandary, "Is it best for a company to build an office in its likeness, or should it acquire an existing operation and merge best practices?" Benefits and drawbacks for both approaches can be debated, but the choice often comes down to the very uniqueness of the individual companies facing this decision.

Moravia Worldwide chose "homegrown" in 2002 when it opened an office in Nanjing, China as a way to better meet its clients' needs for linguistic quality control and cost-efficient software assurance testing. We took a very disciplined approach to resolve the two key issues facing every company today - India or China? and To build or to buy? We discovered that the key challenge was how to safeguard and transfer our unique corporate culture, while at the same time, allowing the new operation to have the right "local feel." Read on to find out how we have achieved success in this balancing act.


Preparing to Enter the China Markets

#61 Volume 15 Issue 1
MultiLingual Computing

Preparing to Enter the China Markets

When contemplating entering the Chinese marketplace, businesses can never do too much planning. On one side of the coin, China is a market ripe with opportunities due in part to its strong labor force and low cost of doing business. But the other side of the same coin shows that it is important not to take China lightly.

As the Asian market, primarily mainland China, continues to open its doors of opportunity to western businesses, many will find that their first experience into China will be ripe with obstacles and pitfalls. These difficulties stem from the fact that many companies fail to pay proper respect to the intricacies and nuances of this new and emerging market because in China, business is guided by a culture and history centuries in the making. Full article.

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